2.08.2015

Turnabout is fair play

Biersteker's prototype. Image from The Guardian.
Artist Thijs Biersteker has created a book that won't open unless it sees a "neutral expression" on its viewer's face, reports Alison Flood for The Guardian. This was bound to happen, considering how many books we judge by their covers. If your face expresses an emotion other than calm blankness, this book will stay closed.

I've written before, at length, about book cover design. Book covers are advertisements, meant to entice potential readers to at least pick the book up and glance at the back cover or inside jacket flap to find out what the book's about. Blogs on tumblr and elsewhere mock bad covers mercilessly.

It's only fair that a book (art project) gets to judge us back. Biersteker has this to say about his project:
My aim was to create a book cover that is human and approachable hi-tech. If you approach the book, if you’re overexcited or your face shows a sceptical expression, the book will stay locked...But if your expression is neutral (no judgment) the system will send an audio pulse and the book will unlock itself. I often worry about my scepticism and judgement getting in the way of my amazement. Judgment should never hinder the relentless enthusiasm of seeing things for the first time. (http://thecoverthatjudgesyou.com/)
My first thought when I saw this story on The Guardian was, "This had better be a friggin' fantastic book." (My first reaction to most modern art is usually skeptical snark.) Then, I thought more about the artist's objective.

I chose to read books based on their reviews and, sometimes, their reputations (as with my classics reading project). I only see covers when the book arrives on my kindle or in my local library. Unless the cover is particularly amazing, I rarely look at the cover again. What makes me skeptical about books is overuse of tropes or pointed criticism in the reviews. Perhaps Thijs Biersteker's project isn't for me?

No, that sounds too smug.

Biersteker has a point about not letting a first impression get in the way of something great. ("This had better be a friggin' fantastic book.") This book isn't about books. The original expression isn't about books, either. It's about prejudice. Biersteker just ran with the idiom.

Still, I will absolutely judge books with covers like this:
Only $2.99!

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